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Posts for tag: dental implants

By Peter Silberstein, DMD
July 26, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Dental ImplantsWould you like a beautiful, functional smile which meets your individual needs and smile goals? Would you like to close gaps so you look your best and stay healthy? Then, explore dental implants from Your Beautiful Smile in Boynton Beach. Dr. Peter Silberstein has recreated perfect smiles for scores of tooth loss patients. He can help you, too.

Implants versus traditional replacements

The modern dental implant gives tooth loss patients many oral health benefits. While conventional dentures and fixed bridgework adequately address some needs, single-tooth dental implants and implant-supported bridges and dentures are superior because they:

  • Are secure
  • Do not require enamel reduction on neighboring teeth (natural teeth must be crowned to support conventional fixed bridgework)
  • Cannot slip or fall out
  • Require no special adhesives, soaks or toothpaste
  • Do not restrict what the patient can eat or drink (it's difficult to bite and chew fibrous vegetables, fruits and meats with traditional dentures)

Even with the initial higher cost of implants, these artificial teeth are cost-effective in the long run. Traditional tooth replacements typically last ten years or so. Dental implants, however, last for many decades.

Receiving dental implants

As a Fellow in the International Congress of Oral Implantologists and specialist in several dental disciplines, Dr. Silberstein expertly evaluates many prospective implant patients at Your Beautiful Smile. Through examination and X-rays, he can tell if you are healthy enough--and have enough bone in your jaw--to receive dental implants.

If you do, placing a single-tooth implant is a simple process--both for the patient and the dentist. It takes about an hour. The dentist inserts the titanium implant into the jawbone and closes the areas with sutures.

Almost immediately, the bone and titanium start to meld. Called osseointegration, this bonding process takes several weeks or months to accomplish, but when finished, it guarantees a solid foundation for a metal alloy extension post and custom-made porcelain crown. For more extensive tooth loss, Dr. Silberstein uses multiple implants, strategically placed in the jaw, to support a bridge or even full dentures.

Caring for your implants

Follow American Dental Association guidelines, and brush twice a day and floss at least once a day. Implant sites can develop an infection called peri-implantitis if not they are not maintained at home and with six-month cleanings with Dr. Silberstein and his team. Also, avoid tobacco as its many toxins degrade gums and bone around dental implants.

Close those gaps

Dental implants will keep you smiling for life. If you'd like more information on these innovative tooth replacements, please call Your Beautiful Smile for an appointment: (561) 459-1600.

By Peter Silberstein, DMD
September 11, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

How much do you know about dental implants? Test yourself with this quiz.

  1. Earliest recorded attempts at using dental implants were from
    1. Medieval England
    2. The ancient Mayans
    3. U.S.A. in the 1950s
  2. Dental implants are called endosseous. What does this mean?
    1. They fuse with the bone
    2. They are inside the mouth
    3. They are not real teeth
  3. What are most dental implants made of?
    1. Aluminum
    2. Titanium
    3. Steel
  4. What part of the tooth does an implant replace?
    1. The implant is the root replacement
    2. The implant is the root plus the crown
    3. The implant is the crown
  5. What is the success rate of dental implants?
    1. 50 percent or less
    2. 75 percent
    3. 95 percent or more
  6. What could cause an implant to fail?
    1. Smoking or drug use
    2. Poor bone quality and quantity at the implant site
    3. Both of the above
  7. What is a tooth's emergence profile?
    1. The implant and crown's shape as it emerges from beneath the gum line
    2. A measure of the urgency of the tooth replacement
    3. A measure of the time it takes for you to be able to chew on the new implant
  8. What are some of the factors that go into the aesthetics of designing the crown?
    1. Choice of materials
    2. Color matching
    3. Both of the above
Answers:
  1. b. The concept of dental implants goes back to the Mayan civilization in 600 AD.
  2. a. The word endosseous (from endo meaning within and osseo meaning bone) refers to the implant's ability to fuse with or integrate with the bone in which it is placed.
  3. b. Most implants are made of a titanium alloy, a metallic substance that is not rejected by the body and is able to fuse with the bone.
  4. a. The term “implant” refers to the root replacement, which is anchored in the gum and bone. A crown is put around the implant where it emerges from the gumline.
  5. c. The majority of studies have shown long term success rates of over 95 percent.
  6. c. Factors that could cause an implant to fail include general health concerns such as smoking and drug use, osteoporosis, or a compromised immune system; poor bone quality or quantity; and poor maintenance such as lack of proper brushing and flossing.
  7. a. The emergence profile has a lot to do with the implant's natural appearance. It involves the way the crown, which attaches to the implant, seemingly emerges through the gum tissue like a natural tooth.
  8. c. Choices such as materials, color, and position can be worked out in the design of a customized temporary crown, which acts as a template or blueprint for a final crown.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about dental implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”

When a device meant to make your life easier doesn't function properly, it can be extremely frustrating. This is sometimes the case for people who wear lower dentures, which loosen over time. These removable replacement teeth can become less reliable and more uncomfortable. Why does this happen?

The answer is bone loss. When a tooth is lost, the bone surrounding it deteriorates and this will change the shape of the jawbone in your mouth. You may find that a lower denture that once had a snug fit on your lower jaw is now sliding around. This happens more often on the bottom because your muscular tongue pushes against the denture. Also, a top denture has more surface area due to an artificial palate to help create suction to the roof of the mouth and keep it in place.

Dental implants, which permanently replace the roots of teeth, do not loosen and they also prevent bone loss. But replacing a whole set of bottom teeth with dental implants and crowns is expensive. What to do?

There's a relatively new solution that combines the security of implants with the affordability of a removable denture. It's called an overdenture, and it may be something you want to consider. An overdenture is a lot like the removable lower denture you already have, only it fits over two implants strategically placed in your lower jaw. While the lower denture is still removable, its stability is greatly improved.

Studies have shown that people with two-implant overdentures have a higher quality of life, and receive better nutrition, than those wearing conventional dentures. It's not hard to figure out why: A more stable denture makes it easier to eat healthy foods such as vegetables — or, really, any foods — and prevents embarrassing slippage of false teeth.

If you are tired of living with a wiggly lower denture, contact us to discuss two-implant overdentures, or to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

You can read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw.”

Anytime you are considering an implant surgery to replace missing teeth, you should take the time to gather the facts so that you have clear understanding of the procedure, your options and any potential risks. You should also feel comfortable with the dental team who is treating you. For these reasons, we created the following comprehensive list of questions so that you can obtain the answers you need to help you feel at ease prior to treatment.

  • Am I a good candidate for dental implants?
  • What is the success rate for dental implants?
  • How long have you been placing implants and how many do you place each year?
  • Can you show me some before and after photos that illustrate your work?
  • What are the risks, benefits and alternatives to dental implants?
  • Are dental implants ever rejected?
  • How do you assess whether I have enough bone to anchor dental implants?
  • Can you tell me about the surgical procedure for implant placement?
  • How long will the entire process take from my first appointment until I have my implant(s) and crown(s) in place?
  • Do I have to go without teeth while my implants are healing?
  • What type of anesthesia will you use during my implant surgery?
  • What can I expect in the hours and days following my implant surgery?
  • How long will it take my implants to heal?
  • How long can I expect my implants to last?
  • Will there be any maintenance required with my implant(s)?
  • How much will dental implant(s) cost?
  • Will my insurance cover all or a portion of the cost?

To learn more, read “Dental Implants, Evaluating Your Professional Options For Care.” Or, you can contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.